Back

The Clydebank declaration: major shipping countries join forces to create green shipping corridors

12.11.21
Many are the appointments about the shipping industry in the COP26 Agenda. One of the 
most revolutionary took place on the 10th November when 19 countries, including US, 
Japan, Germany, Norway, the Netherlands, the UK and Australia signed an agreement to create zero-emissions ocean 

shipping corridors: the Clydebank Declaration. Its aim is, as anticipated, to create green 
corridors for shipping, known as zero-emissions routes, between two or more port pairs. 
This agreement is an important starting point which allows not only for a greener 
shipping system, but also for the catalyzation, by major trade partners, of land-side
investments which are needed to finance green infrastructures for the interested ports. 
The corridor approach, at the same time, incentivizes governments to encourage, or 
eventually even require, that those corridors become exclusive paths for zero-emissions 
vessels only.  
 
The declaration has decided to refer to these green shipping corridors as “zero-emissions 
marine routes”, a decision which has been welcomed by organisations such as the Ocean 
Conservancy and Pacific Environment. Its climate campaign director, Madeline Rose, 
underlined how this new deal on shipping will require new charging stations at the ports 
these vessels frequent. At the same time, Rose also warned Clydebank to solve and avoid 
fossil fuel loopholes and delay tactics. In order to achieve that, interim and definitive 
benchmarks to phase fossil fuel based shipping are necessary. Another positive feedback 
about the agreement came from Nick Brown, CEO of British classification society Lloyd’s 
Register. As Brown stated, the Clydebank enables for a full identification of sites where 
the first investments in land-based technologies for the production of new fuels could 
have the most initial impact: in this sense, the green corridors proposed by the Clydebank 
Declaration are crucial initiatives to support first mover viability.